Things even veteran developers do

It can feel overwhelming to be a new software engineer, but many “noob” things are actually “everybody” things. If any of these things happen to you, know that you’re in good company!

Forget basic syntax and need to Google it

Here’s what my recent search history looks like…

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Fun networking stories: finding the “fast lane”

I went to a boarding school for part of high school. (It was actually a public boarding school—weird, huh?) We lived in an old college dorm that had four floors. I lived on the 4th floor and one particular friend lived on the 1st floor.

Our Internet connection on the 4th floor (and actually most of the building) was pretty bad. We’d usually get around 110 KB/s and sometimes during busy hours it could drop to 30 KB/s with some bad jitter.

My 1st-floor friend, though, consistently got 4 MB/s down and would be playing low-latency Urban Terror while the rest of us upstairs were cursing the school’s IT department. Rumor is that part of the first floor flooded a few years back causing a lot of the wiring and networking to be replaced.

However, a little bit of experimenting showed something promising: I could connect to my friend’s computer downstairs at high speeds, even though at the same time I would have trouble watching YouTube. So, we did what any normal high schoolers would do: we set up OpenVPN, using one of the school-issue laptops as the server downstairs in my friend’s room, and installing the OpenVPN client on my own laptop upstairs. All of a sudden, I could stream videos at 4 MB/s while my next-door neighbors were stuck at 100 KB/s or worse. The only downside was increasing my friend’s latency while he was gaming.

We never did figure out the networking topology of the building, but I doubt it’s gotten much better since.

Linux shortcut to connect to Bluetooth speakers

We have a Bluetooth speaker in our office that we often use to play music through. My Linux machine, however, didn’t automatically connect to the Bluetooth speaker, and even after connecting it, I’d have to switch the output to be that speaker.

I ended up creating a shortcut on my menu bar that would connect to the Bluetooth speaker and set it as the default audio output, all in one click.

First, I went and set up the audio like I normally would, making sure to note the Mac address of the device: (more…)

1850s San Francisco maps vs Today

Wikimedia Commons holds a few remarkable maps of San Francisco from the 1850s. These maps, done as part of the US Coast Survey (now the National Geodetic Survey) were made a half century before the 1906 earthquakes and show a San Francisco that was largely limited to the Northeast part of the current city.

I went ahead and matched up an 1853 map and an 1859 map to today’s map of San Francisco using the amazing Map Warper tool. Shown below are mostly the 1853 maps. All modern-day street maps are copyrighted by the OpenStreetMap contributors. (See bottom of post for links to this map on Map Warper.)

Map Warper - 1853 San Francisco

We see a city that doesn’t extend much past 3rd Street. (more…)

Heroku changing up dyno pricing

Heroku is trialling new pricing levels for their dynos. Here’s the verbatim text they gave:

Free – Experiment in your own dev or demo app with a web and a worker dyno for free. Sleeps after 1 hr of inactivity. Active up to 12 hours a day. No custom domains. 512 MB RAM.

Hobby – Run a small app 24×7 with the Heroku developer experience for $7/dyno/mo. Custom domains. Run a maximum of one dyno per Procfile entry. 512 MB RAM.

Standard 1X, 2X: Build production apps of any size or complexity. Run multiple dynos per Procfile entry to scale out. App metrics, faster builds and preboot. All Hobby features. 512MB or 1GB RAM. $25 or $50/dyno/mo.

Performance – Isolated dynos for your large-scale, high-performance apps. All Standard features. Compose your app with performance and standard dynos. 6GB RAM. $500/dyno/mo.

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Fun networking stories: connecting three machines away via SSH

We had a hardware unit that was Ethernet enabled. To configure and manage it, the vendor provided us with a Windows program that, given the unit’s IP, could establish a TCP connection to the unit’s port 3300 and do all of its fancy management things.

The only problem was, the hardware unit was a hundred miles away on a private subnet at a client’s building, and the only thing that could directly talk to it was Linux computer A that we installed alongside the unit. We had the foresight to install Hamachi on computer A, and my own Linux computer B here also had Hamachi. My clunker Windows laptop C that could actually run the software was hooked up directly to computer B via Ethernet.

So, computer C had the Windows program and could talk to computer B via direct Ethernet. Computer B could talk to computer A via the Internet using Hamachi. And computer A could talk to the hardware unit via its local VLAN.

C -> B -> A -> hardware unit

The transitive property of hooking-up-computers states that if C can talk to B and B can talk to A, then C can talk to A. But how?

Well, when you only have SSH, every problem looks like an SSH connection.

  1. Computer B connected to computer A and established an SSH tunnel. The SSH tunnel forwarded B’s localhost:5000 port to A’s hardwareunit.local:3300. computer-b$ ssh -L5000:hardwareunit.local:3300 computer-a.local
  2. Computer C connected to computer B and established an SSH tunnel. The tunnel forwarded C’s localhost:3300 to B’s localhost:5000. computer-c$ ssh -L 3300:localhost:5000 computer-b.local
  3. Windows program on C connected to C’s localhost:3300, which actually goes to B’s localhost:5000, which actually goes to the hardware unit’s port 3300 via A.

Yes, everything was passed along via two SSH connections in a row, but it worked quite well, and it will save us from driving down to the client in the rare case that we need to do this again.

Not all STEM fields are created equal

Alternate title: “Why do people forget about psychology when talking about STEM?”

STEM majors! Everyone needs to be a STEM major! We have a huge shortage of STEM majors! Quick, get your sons and daughters (especially daughters) to major in a STEM field!

STEM stands for “science, technology, engineering, and mathematics” and we often use it as a big bucket of Things We Want More Of. You hear the president promoting STEM fields, along with the Department of Education. A lot of money is being thrown at convincing more people to major in STEM fields in college, especially towards the issue of getting more women into STEM. (more…)

[transl.] You went overseas—are you happy? (“出国的你 快乐吗”)

Found the below article through so-called “social media”. Don’t have any affiliation with the author nor the WeChat group, but thought it was worth being translated.

Original post at: http://mp.weixin.qq.com/s?__biz=MzA4ODQwMTkyOQ%3D%3D&mid=200035572&idx=1&sn=6fc8fba95e4c22b96616f5cd79b99437


[n.b. photos from original post omitted]

大家看着留学生在国外照的照片,不停说,好羡慕,好美好的生活。
Everyone looking at the photos from students studying abroad keeps saying, “Wow, what a wonderful life. I’m jealous.”
千万不要羡慕,这条路看去光鲜亮丽,其实每走一步就多一个伤痕。
Don’t be jealous, because the road they take might seem bright and glamorous, but every step taken is another scar suffered.

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Workaround for HipChat on Linux: “can’t find build id”, “HashElfTextSection”

The new version of HipChat added support for video and screen-sharing. It also introduced the new requirement of OpenGL 2.0. On my computer, HipChat would crash on startup with repeated messages of

[code]
can’t find build id
HashElfTextSection
can’t find build id
HashElfTextSection
can’t find build id
HashElfTextSection
can’t find build id
HashElfTextSection
[/code]

I wasn’t going to try video chatting on my old netbook anyways, so there’s no reason I needed hardware support for rendering text and emoticons.

First, get your system’s OpenGL info by running `glxinfo | grep OpenGL` and find your version string:

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What concurrency in Node.js could have been

People wrote a lot of good comments on my last post about Node.js. (They also wrote some bad comments, but the worst have been modded out.)

One of the key points I was trying to make was that the way concurrency is written in Node.js sucks, so it blew my mind that people kept referring to new libraries that supposedly fixed things: bluebird, fibers, etc. You see, the callback-hell problem is something that is impossible to fix in “user space”. You either have to modify Node.js internals or design a new language that compiles to JavaScript.

Let me explain.

In a language that allows you to write concurrent code, you might write something like:

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